"Abstract Crossings - Cultural Exchange between Argentina and Brazil" by María Amalia García (Author), Jane Brodie (Translator) / University of California Press

The following excerpt is from Abstract Crossings: Cultural Exchange between Argentina and Brazil by María Amalia García. This is the first book in the new Studies on Latin American Art series, supported by a gift from the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA).


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In the midfifties, abstract art took hold  of the  Latin American  art  scene. It  expanded  until  it  became  synonymous with  modern  art,  and its growing  hegemony  even affected daily life,  which  took  on  a  new  appearance.  The  visual  imaginary of the fifties came to consist of paintings with straight lines; posters, murals,  and landscapes based on geometric  structures; and dresses and tablecloths  with patterns  of squares, circles, and triangles.

This book analyzes the relationship between, on the one hand, the emergence of abstract visions among avant-garde groups and, on the other, the institutionalization and newfound  hegemony of abstract  poetics as part of the region’s imaginary  of modernization. I focus mainly on Argentina and Brazil because of the constant  and  abundant artistic-institutional exchange  between  the two countries, and because of the shared emphasis on abstraction, which  a range  of sectors in both  countries  viewed as an active force in the project of sociocultural transformation. Unlike earlier studies of the growth  of abstraction, which have addressed it in a single nation, I propose a regional approach for the sake of a broader analysis of how abstract poetics took shape in a number of South American cities.

Looking  beyond  national   borders  means  drawing   other  maps  on  the  continent by  linking  cultural scenes  that  may  seem  autonomous.  A regional  vision  provides another  dimension  to our  understanding of formulations and events previously  studied separately; it sheds light on clusters of connections  that  have been largely ignored. My approach  here has two aims: first, to reconstruct the networks  of cultural contacts between regional and international communities tied to abstraction and, second, to provide a comparative analysis of the art scenes in which abstract projects emerged and that they formed part of. Although there were major differences in the circumstances  of, and issues surrounding, how abstract art arose and later developed in Argentina and in Brazil, it shared a common basis in both countries,  one that enables us to adopt a regional perspective.

In recent  decades, abstract  art has become a privileged focus in both Argentine and Brazilian  art history.  It is the object of academic study and the subject of a great many exhibitions  at international cultural centers; abstract works have been acquired by pub- lic and private collections. This recognition  evidences a valorization of abstract  poetics, one that began in the seventies and that,  since the nineties, has become more and more important on the art market. Indeed, because the contemporary art world has focused on avant-garde abstract  works, they are now seen as epitomizing  the modern  tradition in Latin America.

Some art historical discourses have viewed the Latin American abstract avant-garde as derivative  in relation  to the  European historical  avant-garde. But in my view, the intensive development of abstraction in South America requires alternative  explanations. The formulations of abstract art in Latin America did not merely repeat the trends that emerged in Europe in the first decades of the twentieth century;  they were, rather, ret- roactive codifications, rereadings  of the anticipatory and transformative power of those avant-gardes (Foster  2001). Indeed, it could even be argued that the full potential  of the early European avant-gardes’ agendas came to fruition  in the recodifications  enacted by abstract  artists in Latin America. That  perspective enables us to shake up the “myth  of origin”  and to rethink the antinomy  of novelty/repetition, that  is, to reformulate the question  of who  came first based on a heterogeneous  vision of time  (Didi-Huberman 2006, 18–25).

Archive loan from the Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro to the Institute of Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA)

Left image: Lisl Steiner, José Antonio Fernández-Muro in his studio on East 50th Street, New York, New York City, 1964. Chromogenic print from original negative, 2019 (1964), 8 1/2" x 11". Right image: Lisl Steiner, Sarah Grilo in her studio on East 50th Street, New York, New York City, 1964. Chromogenic print from original negative, 2019 (1964), 8 1/2" x 11". Both images: Courtesy of the  Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro  and reproduced with permission from Lisl Steiner. On loan at the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA).

Left image: Lisl Steiner, José Antonio Fernández-Muro in his studio on East 50th Street, New York, New York City, 1964. Chromogenic print from original negative, 2019 (1964), 8 1/2" x 11". Right image: Lisl Steiner, Sarah Grilo in her studio on East 50th Street, New York, New York City, 1964. Chromogenic print from original negative, 2019 (1964), 8 1/2" x 11". Both images: Courtesy of the Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro and reproduced with permission from Lisl Steiner. On loan at the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA).

The Estate of Sarah Grilo is honored to announce the archive loan from the Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro to the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA). Both international figures of Post-War abstraction, the works of Grilo and Fernández-Muro integrate signs, symbols, and language, and dialogue with the cityscape.

Painters Sarah Grilo (Buenos Aires, 1919 – Madrid, 2007) and José Antonio Fernández-Muro (Madrid, 1920 – Madrid, 2014) met in Buenos Aires as students of fine arts and married in 1944. They traveled extensively, exhibited their work internationally, and were acquainted with some of the most important art-world figures of their time. 

The archive is composed of a unique array of materials that includes negatives by photographers such as Lisl Steiner, original photographs by Grete Stern, Hans Namuth and Henry Grossman, international press clippings, and exhibition catalogues in several languages. In addition to their solo careers, these materials also reference the artists' participation in the groups Grupo de Artistas Modernos de la Argentina (GAMA) and Grupo de Los Cinco. The archive pertains to the time Grilo and Fernández-Muro spent in Buenos Aires, New York, Paris, and Madrid, and spans three decades from the 1950s through the 1980s. It represents their respective artistic progressions as they experimented with different painting styles and forged forward in their own careers, and simultaneously reveals the deeply personal side of their shared familial life.

The loan began in 2019 and will initially last for a period of three years. The archive is currently in its first phase of preparation and is still being researched.

Please email ISLAA to schedule an appointment if you would like to visit the archive.

A CONVERSATION STARTER: THE DAVIS’ LATIN AMERICAN SURVEY SHOW SPARKLES - by Elizabeth Michelman

James Oles, professor of Latin American Art History at Wellesley and curator of Latin American Art at the Davis Museum, has for the past 20 years been building up a Latin American collection befitting an important regional museum. The three-dozen works in the collection in 1996 now exceed 500. A third of Oles’ new finds are showcased in “Art_Latin_America: Against the Survey” through June 9. One-third of the featured artists are women. The exhibition’s depth and value are confirmed in an impressive 260-page catalog containing commentaries from a wide field of experts on each work and artist.

Untitled (ca. 1970), oil on canvas / Davis Museum at Wellesley College, MA

Untitled (ca. 1970), oil on canvas / Davis Museum at Wellesley College, MA

Oles’ permissive title gathers on our radar 20th-century works by residents, travelers, visitors and exiles. “Latin American” justifies allowing Puerto Rican Abstract Expressionist “Olga Albizu as well as Chicano and Mexican-American printmakers while excluding their counterparts from outside of Latin America, placing Olga Albizu next to the Argentine gestural expressionist Sarah Grilo rather than with a painting by her mentor Hans Hofmann; or comparing Chicano prints to [earlier] Mexican posters, rather than those by African-American contemporaries.”

To read more: https://artscopemagazine.com/2019/02/a-conversation-starter-the-davis-latin-american-survey-show-sparkles/

"La mítica galería de arte Bonino regresa en una muestra en Nueva York" - El Clarín, Buenos Aires

En octubre, exhibirán documentos inéditos, textos y fotos históricas de ese espacio de vanguardia entre los años 50 y 70. La colección pertenece a la Fundación Espigas.

Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward in the opening of “Magnet: New York”, in Galeria Bonino, New York, 1964. A work by Sarah Grilo, “Charge” (1964), is showing in the background. Photo: © Lisl Steiner

Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward in the opening of “Magnet: New York”, in Galeria Bonino, New York, 1964. A work by Sarah Grilo, “Charge” (1964), is showing in the background.
Photo: © Lisl Steiner

La Fundación Espigas, mayor archivo de arte latinoamericano, se prepara para inaugurar una muestra impactante en Nueva York. Será a partir de octubre, en el consulado argentino, y evocará el acervo documental de la histórica Galería Bonino, espacio de vanguardia que tuvo sedes simultáneas entre los años 50 y 70 en Buenos Aires, Río de Janeiro y esa ciudad estadounidense.

La exhibición reunirá un ecléctico material: fotos de Paul Newman o Marcello Mastroianni asistiendo a las inauguraciones, afiches de La ciudad Hidroespacial de Gyula Kosice o litografías de Raquel Forner.

The ‘Grupo de los cinco’. From left to right: Clorindo Testa, Miguel Ocampo (on the background), Sarah Grilo, José Antonio Fernández-Muro and Kazuya Sakai (on the foreground). Buenos Aires, 1960  Photo: © Diana Levillier

The ‘Grupo de los cinco’.
From left to right: Clorindo Testa, Miguel Ocampo (on the background), Sarah Grilo, José Antonio Fernández-Muro and Kazuya Sakai (on the foreground). Buenos Aires, 1960

Photo: © Diana Levillier

“El material donado a Espigas por Fernanda Bonino, la última esposa del galerista, reúne cinco mil folios, que muestran documentos inéditos como una foto de Paul Newman en un opening de la galería, donde se lo ve junto a pinturas de los argentinos Sarah Grilo y Marcelo Bonevardi; otra imagen de Marcello Mastroianni visitando la exposición de su primo, el artista Humberto Mastroianni, o la impactante imagen de John Lennon y Yoko Ono el día que la sede de Nueva York organizó una muestra de Nam June Paik, en 1971”, contó a la agencia Télam Agustín Diez Fischer, director del Centro de Estudios Espigas.

(…)

Read more: https://www.clarin.com/cultura/nueva-york-muestra-revelara-documentos-ineditos-galeria-argentina-vanguardia_0_hCTe9Lc0T.html

"7 Latin American Artists You Should Know" - Adam Heardman, MutualArt

Sarah Grilo is considered among the most important Latin artists of the 20th century. In 1962, a Guggenheim Fellowship allowed her to move to New York, and her art followed a trajectory typical of Latin American painters of the era, moving from geometric abstraction into a more gestural abstract expressionism.

Untitled (1978), oil on canvas / Sotheby’s, New York

Untitled (1978), oil on canvas / Sotheby’s, New York

Azul (1958), oil on canvas / Christie’s, New York

Azul (1958), oil on canvas / Christie’s, New York

Made for you (1963), oil on canvas / Sotheby’s, New York

Made for you (1963), oil on canvas / Sotheby’s, New York

This May, Untitled (1978) comes to Sotheby’s Contemporary Day Sale with a high estimate of $70,000. Though infrequently sold on the secondary market, works by Grilo have proven strong performers before. Azul (1958) sold for $47,500 in November last year, against a high estimate of $25,000, and Made For You (1963) sold for $35,000 at Sotheby’s Online Sale of Latin American art last May against a high estimate of $15,000.

"CINCO PINTORES - JOSÉ ANTONIO FERNÁNDEZ -MURO / SARAH GRILO / MIGUEL OCAMPO / KASUYA SAKAI / CLORINDO TESTA" at Galería Roldán Moderno, Buenos Aires

Convocados por Jorge Romero Brest, por aquel entonces director del museo, las obras de Fernández-Muro, Grilo, Ocampo, Sakai y Testa engalanaron en julio de 1960 las salas del Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes. A casi sesenta años de la icónica muestra “Cinco pintores” Roldan Moderno se complace en reivindicar la visión y labor de Romero Brest en el desarrollo de la historia del Arte Argentino de mitad del siglo XX, pero primordialmente, homenajear uno de sus grandes hitos: El grupo de los cinco.

The ‘Grupo de los cinco’. From left to right: Clorindo Testa, Miguel Ocampo (on the background), Sarah Grilo, José Antonio Fernández-Muro and Kazuya Sakai (on the foreground). Buenos Aires, 1960  Photo: © Diana Levillier

The ‘Grupo de los cinco’.
From left to right: Clorindo Testa, Miguel Ocampo (on the background), Sarah Grilo, José Antonio Fernández-Muro and Kazuya Sakai (on the foreground). Buenos Aires, 1960

Photo: © Diana Levillier

Los agrupamientos por generación, afinidades o incluso ocurrencias de terceros pueden conspirar contra la singularidad del artista que se pierde en los rasgos generales de la escuela. En la producción de Fernández-Muro, Grilo, Ocampo, Sakai y Testa, si bien predomina la abstracción que flexibiliza rigores de la geometría y una poética aplicada en el uso del color y la creación de atmósferas intensas, prevalece ante todo la heterogeneidad estética y la impronta personal. El encanto de su trabajo colectivo se funda en las materialidades y estilos disimiles que permite destacar la obra de cada uno de ellos de forma individual, pero operando en conjunto. El grupo fue consolidado por afinidad y respeto entre colegas, sin embargo, cada uno siguió su trayectoria propia respondiendo a su voluntad creativa personal, incluso en la única muestra que realizaron juntos.

En última instancia, la selección y enunciación de los cinco en tanto grupo estuvo determinada por la confianza de Romero Brest en el desarrollo de sus carreras como artistas de una generación intermedia con un futuro prometedor, pero especialmente, en la potencial internacionalización de su obra. En este sentido, su presentación en la institución de mayor prestigio para la difusión y legitimación de las artes visuales en la escena local de la época, fue el puntapié de la premonición.

La distancia histórica nos permite reconocer hoy el futuro inmediato a tales afirmaciones. El fructífero período de Ocampo en París durante la década del ´60; la conquista de Nueva York lograda por Grilo y Fernández-Muro antes de su radicación en Madrid; la prolífera carrera de Testa con base nacional, pero en permanente diálogo con Europa y Estados Unidos, así como el éxito de Sakai en México y su posterior asentamiento en Dallas.

De esta forma, exilios voluntarios, o forzados, avatares históricos y pequeños grandes triunfos impregnaron en mayor o menor medida la carrera de estos cinco artistas que, tal como pronosticó Romero Brest, fueron reconocidos y celebrados hasta destacarse en las colecciones más notorias del arte moderno local e internacional.

Sarah Grilo.  Profunda percusión , 1962. Oil on canvas. 128 x 160 cm.

Sarah Grilo. Profunda percusión, 1962. Oil on canvas. 128 x 160 cm.

Inauguración miércoles 27 marzo, 19 hs.
Del 28 marzo al 19 abril 2019
Lun/Vie 10 a 19 hs

Panel discussion - "Reflections on Latin American Abstraction: Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro"

The Institute of Fine Arts is pleased to present Reflections on Latin American Abstraction: Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro, a panel discussion tracing the development of Argentinian Abstract art during the abstract phenomenon in Latin America during the 1960s and 1980s decades.

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Held in conjunction with the exhibition Grilo/Fernández-Muro:1962-1984 currently on view at The James B. Duke House exhibiting the work of artists Sarah Grilo (1919-2007) and José Antonio Fernández-Muro (1920-2014), the panel features a conversation between Mateo Fernández-Muro, grandson and Co-executor of the Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro, and Lisl Steiner, Austrian-American photographer. 

Mateo Fernández-Muro is the grandson and co-executor of the Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro. He has contributed extensively to the Estate, aiming to preserve and advance global understanding of the legacy of the artists' life and artwork.

Lisl Steiner is a New York resident, who lived between Argentina, United States and Europe. Active during the 1940s and 1950s Argentinean art scene, Steiner was involved with numerous art groups and artists, among them Arte Madí, Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro.  She also contributed to Life, Time, Newsweek and The New York Times publications as a freelance photojournalist.

Moderated by Dr. Edward Sullivan and MA candidate and co-curators Andrea Carolina Zambrano, Damasia Lacroze, Emireth Herrera and Juan Gabriel Ramírez Bolívar.

Grilo/Fernández-Muro: 1962-1984  is generously funded by the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA). Special thanks to the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, Cecilia de Torres, Ltd., and Mateo Fernández-Muro, Co-executor of the Estate of Sarah Grilo and Jose Antonio Fernández-Muro.

March 25, 2019
6:00-7:30pm
RSVP

The Duke House Exhibition Series
The Institute of Fine Arts
New York University
The James B. Duke House

"Grilo/Fernández-Muro: 1962-1984" at The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University

As part of the Duke House Exhibition Series, the Institute of Fine Arts is pleased to present the work of the Argentinian artists Sarah Grilo (1919-2007) and José Antonio Fernández-Muro (1920-2014).

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Opening February 12, 2019, the exhibition Grilo/Fernández-Muro: 1962-1984 seeks to map the influences and movements that inspired their artistic practices from the 1960s through the 1980s. The show features a selection of abstract paintings which create an intimate dialogue between Fernández-Muro’s mimicry of urban and industrial patterns and Grilo’s morphological style. In addition to these paintings, the exhibition also includes an array of exhibition catalogues, publications, documentary photographs, and other rare archival materials. This exhibition is accompanied by a forthcoming panel discussion that includes a conversation with Mateo Fernández-Muro, the artists's grandson and co-executor of The Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro, moderated by Edward Sullivan, Deputy Director and Helen Gould Sheppard Professor in the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts.

Grilo/Fernández-Muro: 1962-1984 was organized by Andrea Carolina Zambrano, Damasia Lacroze, Emireth Herrera, and Juan Gabriel Ramírez Bolívar, and was made possible through the support of the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, Cecilia de Torres Ltd. New York, and The Estate of Sarah Grilo and José Antonio Fernández-Muro. This exhibition is generously funded by the Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA).

Opening: February 12, 2019 - 7.30 pm

Exhibition Dates: February 12 through May 24, 2019

Exhibition Location: The James B. Duke House, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. 1 E. 78th Street, New York NY 10075

Viewing hours: Monday to Friday, from 1 pm to 4 pm

"Signos", October 13th - November 17 2018 | Galerie Lelong & Co. is presenting for the first time a selection of works on paper by Sarah Grilo

Galerie Lelong & Co. is presenting for the first time a selection of works on paper by the Argentinean artist Sarah Grilo (1919 – 2007). These works, created in Madrid between 1970 and 1990, are among the most emblematic of her output. They illustrate her emancipation from the group of abstract painters, the “Artistas Modernos de la Argentina” with whom she started her career and demonstrate her creative freedom. Moving away from the geometric abstraction that characterised her early production, these compositions clearly convey the agitation of modern urban life. Words, letters, numbers and graffiti appear, overlap, combine and are a visual transposition of how the noises, colours and forms of the big city appeared to her when she arrived in Manhattan in 1957.

Sin título  (1991), Oil on paper / Galerie Lelong & Co., Paris

Sin título (1991), Oil on paper / Galerie Lelong & Co., Paris

Sarah Grilo is a major figure of Latin-American art of the second half of the 20th Century. She worked in Buenos Aires, Paris, New York and Madrid. Her work has been the subject of a number of one-man shows in the US, Latin America and Europe: at the national fine arts museum in Buenos Aires, the fine arts museum in Caracas, the Institut de Arte Contemporáneo of Lima, the Solomon R. Guggenheim museum in New York, the Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO) in Miami, the American Art Museum in Washington DC, the Nelson Rockefeller collection in New York, the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid. In 2017, Grilo’s work featured in the "Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction" exhibition at the MoMA in New York.

Sin título  (1978), Oil on paper / Galerie Lelong & Co., Paris

Sin título (1978), Oil on paper / Galerie Lelong & Co., Paris

"Sarah Grilo and the Urban Unconscious" | September - December 2018 | Opening Reception: Thursday, September 20, 6-8 pm

Cecilia de Torres, Ltd. is pleased to present a selection of works by Argentine artist Sarah Grilo (1919-2007) that were created following her time in New York City from 1962 to 1970.

Installation view of "Sarah Grilo and the Urban Unconscious", Cecilia De Torres, Ltd. New York, 2018

Installation view of "Sarah Grilo and the Urban Unconscious", Cecilia De Torres, Ltd. New York, 2018

“The Urban Unconscious” is comprised of paintings and works on paper from the 1970s, 80s, and 90s that capture the formal elements which Grilo absorbed from the urban landscape that surrounded her during these eight pivotal years.

Grilo moved to New York City in 1962 upon receiving a J. S. Guggenheim Fellowship, and it was at this point that her work took a radical turn. Grilo broke from her background in Concrete abstraction, and began to incorporate—through her own unconscious formal means—the urban references that surrounded her: from the graffiti that ran rampant throughout the city’s walls, to the traces of letters, numbers, and symbols in various fonts and typographies that peeled off the posters plastered around the city streets.
 
Grilo’s appropriations during her stay in 1960s New York continued to define her work over the course of the remaining decades, all while maintaining an acute sensibility to color in her highly lyrical and gestural compositions.

Installation view of "Sarah Grilo and the Urban Unconscious", Cecilia De Torres, Ltd. New York, 2018

Installation view of "Sarah Grilo and the Urban Unconscious", Cecilia De Torres, Ltd. New York, 2018

"Sarah Grilo and the Urban Unconscious", at Cecilia De Torres, Ltd., New York

“The Urban Unconscious” presents a selection of works by Argentine artist Sarah Grilo that were created in the years following her time in New York City from 1962 to 1970. This exhibition of paintings and works on paper from the 1970s, 80s, and 90s captures the formal elements which emerged during these eight highly pivotal years in the trajectory of the artist’s oeuvre.

Grilo moved to New York City in 1962 after being awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, and it was at this critical point that the artist’s work took a radical turn as she broke from her background in Concrete abstraction. Grilo appropriated—through her own unconscious formal means—the graffiti that ran rampant throughout the city’s walls, the pieces of letters and numbers in various fonts and typographies that peeled off the signs on the sides of buildings, and the traces of deteriorating posters plastered around the city streets. All of these urban incorporations were covered by compulsively repetitive, erased, and re-written spontaneous scribbles, as if automatic writings were taking over her compositions.

Sin título  (1979), Oil on paper / Cecilia de Torres, Ltd., New York

Sin título (1979), Oil on paper / Cecilia de Torres, Ltd., New York

Grilo’s works then and in the proceeding decades, all sustained a hyper-chromatic sensibility as manifested by her use of saturations of various tonalities and hues: from the most resplendent of golds to the deepest of violets, and from the loudest of turquoise and fuchsias, to the palest of yellows and sky blues.

This exhibition stands testament to the continuity of the formal elements which Grilo began to appropriate in the 1960s, and continued to employ throughout the remainder of her life. These works all share the same lyrical compositions that draw in the elements of time and the unconscious—for it is time that allows the viewer to decipher the various urban imprints, and time that in turn imprints this system of signs, numbers, letters, and scribbles in the viewer’s eye and their own unconscious. Grilo allows us to witness her process: from her drips of paint of various colors, to her highly gestural markings and erasures. All of these highlight the artist’s hand, as well as her own unconscious absorption of the urban landscape surrounding her.

Sin título  (1984), oil on paper / Cecilia de Torres, Ltd., New York

Sin título (1984), oil on paper / Cecilia de Torres, Ltd., New York

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 20, 6-8 pm

On view until December 2018.

 

Read more at: 
https://www.artsy.net/cecilia-de-torres-ltd/article/cecilia-de-torres-ltd-sarah-grilo-urban-unconscious

"Sarah Grilo: la consagración de una pintora argentina", press release by Eduardo Villar on El Clarín, Argentina

Lelong, una de las grandes galerías del mercado de arte, representará su legado en París y Nueva York.

Bossa nova  (1965), óleo sobre tela / Galería Jorge Mara-La Ruche, Buenos Aires

Bossa nova (1965), óleo sobre tela / Galería Jorge Mara-La Ruche, Buenos Aires

La francesa Lelong, una de las galerías más importantes del mundo, con sedes en París y Nueva York, representará la obra de la artista argentina Sarah Grilo, figura clave en el arte abstracto iberoamericano de posguerra. Grilo (Buenos Aires, 1917 – Madrid, 2007) pasará así a formar parte del selecto grupo de latinoamericanos -como el brasileño Hélio Oiticica y la cubana Ana Mendieta- representados por Lelong, que también expone obra de artistas de primera línea internacional como Giacometti, Calder, Miró, Louise Bourgeois y Jaume Plensa, entre otros. 

La Galerie Lelong ya prepara una muestra con obras de Grilo sobre tela y papel que se exhibirán por primera vez en París con el título Signos, entre el 13 de octubre y el 17 de noviembre. Además, incluirá varias pinturas de la argentina en su stand de FIAC (Feria Internacional de Arte Contemporáneo), que se realizará en la capital francesa del 18 al 21 de octubre. 

La novedad fue revelada por Jorge Mara, director de Jorge Mara-La Ruche, que es la galería de Sarah Grilo en Buenos Aires desde hace años. El interés de la galería francesa por la obra de Grilo se despertó en diciembre del año pasado, cuando uno de sus directores, Jean Frémon, vio una de sus pinturas en el stand de Mara-La Ruche en la feria Art Basel Miami y quedó deslumbrado. Al día siguiente volvió al stand con otro directivo de Lelong y pidieron ver más pinturas de Grilo. Para ellos fue un descubrimiento y su interés no dejó de crecer desde ese día. Meses después, Mara se entrevistó con los directores de Lelong en Madrid y allí facilitó el contacto de los franceses con la familia de la artista, con la que se reunieron y llegaron a un acuerdo para representar su legado. 

Dos años antes el MoMA de Nueva York le había comprado a Mara una pintura de Grilo, en una decisión en la que tuvo mucho que ver Luis Pérez Oramas, entonces curador principal de arte latinoamericano del museo neoyorkino. El año pasado esa obra,Add, un óleo sobre tela de gran formato, formó parte de la muestra Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction en ese museo, donde se exhibió junto a más de 100 obras de unas 50 artistas mujeres. 

NY4 ( 1967), óleo sobre tela / Galería Jorge Mara-La Ruche, Buenos Aires

NY4 (1967), óleo sobre tela / Galería Jorge Mara-La Ruche, Buenos Aires

Además de ser su galerista en Buenos Aires, Mara es un estudioso y fervoroso admirador de la obra de Sarah Grilo. “Yo creo que es la mejor pintora de su generación, pero hasta ahora no se le ha hecho mucha justicia, está un poco olvidada. Hay una deuda con ella”, dijo en diálogo con Clarín. Ahora continuará difundiendo su obra en el exterior: en su stand de Art Basel Miami mostrará este año una serie de escrituras de Grilo y de León Ferrari. 

Sarah Grilo comenzó sus primeros estudios de pintura en el país. En 1952 formó parte del Grupo de Artistas Modernos de la Argentina animado por Aldo Pellegrini, que incluía a Enio Iommi, Tomás Maldonado, Alfredo Hlito, Lidy Prati y José Antonio Fernández-Muro (su marido), entre otros. El grupo realizó exposiciones en el Museo de Arte Moderno de Río de Janeiro y en el Stedelijk de Amsterdam, antes de disolverse en 1957. 

En 1956, la obra de Grilo formó parte del envío argentino a la Bienal de Venecia. 

Junto a Kazuya Sakai, Clorindo Testa, Fernández-Muro y Miguel Ocampo, Grilo integró el grupo de artistas representados por la mítica Galería Bonino, de Buenos Aires. 

Tras recibir la Beca Guggenheim en 1961, Sarah Grilo se estableció en Nueva York. La influencia de esta ciudad fue determinante para la evolución de su arte. Allí incorporó en sus obras la escritura y el grafitti y se convirtió en una pionera en el uso de estos recursos. 

En 1971 se mudó a España junto con su marido Fernández-Muro y los hijos de ambos. Trabajó con rigor y entusiasmo hasta el final de su vida. Falleció en Madrid en 2007. 

 

Read the article on Clarín: 
https://www.clarin.com/cultura/sarah-grilo-consagracion-pintora-argentina_0_S1UBP4KVX.html

Las mujeres protagonizan "la conquista de la Luna" en el Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires

En el marco de la conmemoración del mes de la mujer, el Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes inauguró el jueves 1 de marzo la muestra "A la conquista de la luna" con obras de artistas femeninas pertenecientes a la colección del museo.

La exposición está integrada por obras de gran formato y realizadas con materiales pesados, técnicas que en su momento parecían ajenas a la mujer y que significaron un desafío y una transgresión a las jerarquías de género.

Como parte de las acciones del mes de la mujer, el MNBA adhiere además a la iniciativa del colectivo "Nosotras proponemos" para museos y galerías. De este modo, desde el 2 hasta el 18 de marzo, de 18 a 18.30 sólo quedarán iluminadas las obras realizadas por artistas mujeres en la primera planta, con el objeto de señalar la desigualdad de género histórica en la inclusión de obras en las salas.

Así, las protagonistas de la primera planta del museo serán Raquel Forner, Alicia Penalba, Delia Cancela, Marta Minujín, Gertrudis Chale, Margarita Paksa, Diana Aisenberg, Liliana Maresca, Marcia Schvartz, Liliana Porter, Martha Boto, Grete Stern, Sara Facio, Juana Romani, Dora Maar, Lía Gismondi, Louise Nevelson y Sarah Grilo.

Pintura (en rojos)  (1958), by  Sarah Grilo, illuminated during the “blackouts” for International Women Month at Museo Nacional de Bellas Aertes, Buenos Aires

Pintura (en rojos) (1958), by Sarah Grilo, illuminated during the “blackouts” for International Women Month at Museo Nacional de Bellas Aertes, Buenos Aires

En tanto, la programación incluye la performance "Impermanencia", una intervención coreográfica dirigida por Victoria Keriluk, que propone un diálogo con las obras de las artistas y se llevará a cabo los días 22, 23, 24, 25, 29, 30 y 31 de marzo y el 1 de abril a las 18.00.

La directora artística del museo, Mariana Marchesi, considera que esta muestra "no se trata simplemente de reunir a un grupo de excelentes artistas", sino que se propone generar en el visitante la pregunta sobre el lugar que ocupa la mujer en el mundo del arte y la cultura.

Por su parte, el director del Bellas Artes, Andrés Duprat, señaló que las autoridades del museo reafirman "el compromiso de generar acciones concretas para revertir la situación histórica, donde la mujer estuvo siempre relegada".

La muestra A la conquista de la luna podrá visitarse desde el 2 de marzo hasta el 15 de abril, con entrada libre y gratuita. Además, quienes asistan podrán recorrer la colección permanente del Bellas Artes.